Art

Finding the Art in Life

The rhythm of life is something with which we are all familiar. Alarm clock, shower, eat, work, relax, sleep. So goes a typical day. I’ve decided that this kind of life structure, while admirable, tried-and-true, is not really how I go about my life. Letting art into my life, in nearly any way possible is my way of making sure that “mundane” is not an adjective associated with my life.

Everyday, I try to appreciate art, whether it be in cooking, reading, watching, writing, going to class…EVERYTHING.

On WordPress and Tumblr, I will share those experiences. I’m inviting you to walk to this beat with me. See you soon.

-Kadence

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Total Fan of Adaptive Reuse!

Today, while reading one of my million daily newsletters, I was inspired to find my readers some stories about Adaptive Reuse. What exactly is adaptive reuse, you might ask? In my opinion, it’s when people ingeniously utilize a space or building for something other than its original intention. This usually requires a change in codes and zoning of course, but how can one not love something so….sustainable? Here are a few examples I’ve found in my search today:

1. The Bemis Building – right here in Seattle’s SODO neighborhood! A very old (by American standards of course) burlap factory that was turned into incredible artists’ live/work lofts.

2. Ruined Georgian Church turned into Home in England – thank you Freshome Blog! GORGEOUS example of how a couple turned an ancient church into a new home. Definitely an appreciation of history here!

3. 7 (More) Amazing Adaptive Reuse Architecture Projects –  WebUrbanist’s list of some incredible examples of this GREAT topic!

These are just a few of the myriads of examples available to you on the web. I love that there are designers and architects out there who are willingly thinking completely outside the “building it new is always better” box!


Exit Through the Gift Shop: A Review

From such a humble street entrance, not many would hazard a guess that inside is one of the most unique theaters Seattle has to offer: the Harvard Exit Theatre! Tucked away in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood at 807 E Roy St, this quaint little brick building is a perfect venue for your latest interest in film of the independent, foreign or indie genres.

Operated by Landmark Theatres since 1979, but built in 1925, the theatre is sure to impress; from the charming outdoor ticket window, to the small concessions booth (sans long lines and screaming children) offering classic popcorn with a twist: soy butter, and a friendly and quiet staff, all among old world architectural details throughout! Prices are also less steep and the environment is much more suitable for enjoyment of the art that is film.

Definitely worth the jaunt from Downtown!

Chris and I decided to go an afternoon date to this little jewel, to see a movie that was definitely strikingly different than the surroundings of the venue: Exit Through the Gift Shop.

This movie, if you haven’t heard, is a documentary originally intended to be about the notorious British street artist, Banksy, but which was later turned into a documentary about the not-as-well-known, but still notorious, Mr. BrainWash. The film ultimately turns into a documentary about the entire Street Art movement, enlightening, funny, and interesting even in its dullest moments. The account is one of the most vivid and thorough of the documentation of illegal art since probably Tony Silver’s Style Wars.

The film follows the filmmaker-turned-artist, Thierry Guetta or “Mr. BrainWash,” on his journey into a world that he only happened upon but became utterly enthralled with. I personally felt that the movie was a mix of documentary and historical or educational. Any fan of Street Art or Modern Art in general should see this movie. It’s a great way of really getting into the world of subversive art. The film will only be on at the Harvard Exit Theatre in Seattle a bit longer, so don’t hesitate! Cast/Testimonial Interviews include: Banksy, Thierry Guetta, Shepard Fairey, the Space Invader, just to drop a few names.

See the trailer here | Visit the Harvard Exit Theatre here


Pasta with Low(er) Fat Garlic Cream(y) Sauce and a few SURPRISES!

ToTD: Cooking Experiments! (And shopping at a Seattle landmark)

The adventure started a couple days ago, when I was Stumbling-Upon (what an amazing idea BTW!). I came upon a recipe on a website called Kathy Maister’s Start Cooking. The recipe was quite peculiar: Sauteed Fiddlehead Ferns. I was so excited and couldn’t wait to visit my local Trader Joe’s, because honestly, I’d never heard of these little treasures! Unfortunately, upon visiting my trusted grocery store, they were no where to be found! I continued to think about these baby fern fronds the next two days. However, a friend of mine also happened to be visiting Seattle for the first time, which means that she naturally wanted to visit the world-renowned Pike Place Market. Here I continued my search for for FF’s, dragging my friend along on the pretense of “showing her the market” of course! The first grower I asked was perplexed, asked me what the devil I was talking about, and upon hearing my explanation said, “Lady, that sounds like something you’ll have to go find in your own backyard. Nothing like that here.” Fail. The second grower we strolled past DID have these little beauties, and my friend was the first one to see the sign! (Thanks Mary!) Upon returning home, with mon petit chou of grocery items in hand, I created the following with the beginnings of Kathy Meister’s recipe, along with many more additions of my own. It was delightful and it only took about 30 minutes TOTAL to make including prep!

Fiddlehead Ferns and Mushrooms with Pasta in a Garlic Cream Sauce (serves 2, with leftovers)

1 lb Fiddlehead Ferns

2 cups sliced white button mushrooms

2 large cloves of garlic

1 Tbsp olive oil

salt, pepper to taste

juice of 1/2 a lemon

1 cup non-fat milk

1/2 cup plain non-fat yogurt

2 Tbsp cornstarch

1/4 cup Parmesan cheese

2 cups whole wheat pasta (any variety)

1. Fill a large sauce pan with salted water and set on the stove to boil. Prepare the fiddleheads just as Kathy suggests on her website: rinse, boil in the pot on the stove, and then rinse in a chilled bowl of water AFTER boiling. Strain and set aside.

2. Refill the sauce pan with salted water and set to boil. In the meantime, in a frying pan, begin to heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. After a couple minutes, add the garlic. Once lightly browned on the edges, add the mushrooms and the fiddleheads and sautee, sprinkling with the lemon juice. Do NOT over cook! After 2-3 minutes, add the milk, yogurt and salt and pepper. Stir together and allow to boil. Add most of the Parmesan cheese and all of the cornstarch; stir together again, reduce heat, and let the sauce simmer while covered. Stir occasionally to keep from burning.

3. Add the pasta to the boiling pot of water. Cook til perfectly al dente, approximately 7-9 minutes (for my pasta). Strain and add to the sauce, which should now be nearly perfectly thickened. Stir together and allow to cook, covered, for no longer than 5 minutes.

4. Plate, garnish with some of the remaining Parmesan and pepper, and ENJOY! MMMMMmmmm!!!!


Oooh: Yes I’m a bit of a design geek.

TotD: (A new thing I’m going to try, called Topic of the Day) Yang’s Blog on the De Stijl

While on break between classes, I stumbled upon (not the actual program, but in reality – Thank you Google!) another design student’s blog. What got me to go there? Something for research involving one of my classes (De Stijl), but for what will I go back? <– Therein lies the question I’m sure many bloggers themselves often ask about their own readers and blog topics.

Well, in my opinion, I look for articles that are:

– INTERESTING,

-UNIQUE,

– ENTERTAINING,

– ARTICULATE, or

– INSPIRING.

On that note, I would like to make a great call-out to Yang from yangsquare.com. I loved the piece you did about De Stijl, Rietveld, and, naturally, the Schroeder Huis in Utrecht, The Netherlands. As a design student, I know how much work it takes to research, develop CAD drawings, build accurate models, create digital models and render beautiful drawings. I commend you, Yang, and also want to say thank you, for consolidating it into one great post. I’d also like to add for anyone interested (umm….yes I was and I guess this is the geeky part) you can download Yang’s drawing file with floorplans, elevations, sections, and axonometrics.

If you’re wondering what one could ever want these for…well, I guess you just have to be a bit of a history and design addict to understand.

Yes – I downloaded it…it was my guilty pleasure for the day!


Interesting Find: The Roland Collection of Films on Arts

http://www.rolandcollection.com/films/?prm=a13-b113-c1143-d0-e0

Really cool, and AWESOME videos for students or professionals to check out, especially if interested in Design, Architecture, ART in general.

History of Design III today with Loucinda (my instructor) was really interesting, we are starting with De Stijl and early modernists. Commercial Design is already going well, studying the history of office design, and developing a design of our own.

Personal note: I’m going to start my own version of a “to-do-before-death” list, more a “travel here, see this before I die” list. First entry: The Rietveld-Schroeder Huis (house) in Utrecht, The Netherlands. More to come. A LOT MORE TO COME.

-Kadence


Just passing some time 4.7.10

Sitting at Bedlam Coffee in Belltown – I like. Great music and Nutella Mochas. Waiting to meet Jenn and Sam for my internship this week. It’s amazing. I just really wanted to tell everyone that. Bemis is going really well. I’m so glad that I have this incredible opportunity to be a part of establishing it. I love that it was just something I happened upon, and can make time for an extracurricular internship. Meeting and interviewing all of these incredible people makes me feel more insignificant but involved and excited and talented all at once. I love it. Well, back to real work.

P.S. I got Chris to join Twitter – FINALLY! It’s such a great way to network with other designers and people, in general. Mine = @KadenceESeattle, Chris = @ChrisLyleDesign

P.P.S. Bemis is there too = @BemisArt. PLUS – my personal art project, the KL Project = @Letartin! Follow all of us!